Dr. Saviour Mantey

INSTITUTIONS ATTENDED

1. University of Mines and Technology, Tarkwa, Ghana, 2012 to 2015

2. University of Cambridge, UK, 2004 - 2005

3. Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana, 1999 - 2003

 

PROFESSIONAL BODY MEMBERSHIP

1. Professional Member, GhIS (Ghana Institution of Surveyors), 2016 to date

2Fellow, Cambridge Commonwealth Trust, 2005 to date

3. Member, IEEE- GRSS (Institute of Electronic and  Electrical Engineers – Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society), 2011 to date

4. Member, AARSE (African Association of Remote Sensing of the Environment), 2010 to date

5. Member, (ICA) International Cartographic Association, Commission on Geospatial Analysis and Modeling, 2010 to date

 

AWARDS

1. GETFund, Ghana, Staff development Fund to pursue PhD at UMaT, Ghana, 2012

2. St Edmund's College, Cambridge, Tutorial award for MPhil research work, 2005

3. Commonwealth Trust Academic Scholarship, 2004

 

ACADEMIC RANKS HELD

1. Senior Lecturer, 2015 to date

1. Lecturer, 2008 - 2015

2. Teaching Assistant, 2003 - 2004 

 

SUBJECTS TAUGHT

I have been lecturing various courses of the Geomatic Engineering curriculum at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The undergraduate courses include; Field Astronomy, Astronomy, Principles of Cadastral Surveying, Adjustments and Computations, Least Square Adjustments, Introduction to Geomatics, Survey Instrumentation, Field Trip and Technical Report Writing. I also lecture GIS and Remote Sensing Applications at the postgraduate level.

 

SUPERVISION OF STUDENTS RESEARCH PROJECT /THESIS

I have successfully supervised a total of 25 undergraduate research projects in the Geomatic Engineering Department and have served as Internal Examiner for more than 30 of such projects.

 

OTHER PROFESSIONALLY RELATED EXPERIENCE

1. Visiting Lecturer/Scholar, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Department of Surveying, South Africa, August, 2014

2. Visiting Academic/Researcher, University of Cape Town, The School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics, South Africa, August, 2014

3. Reviewer, Online Journal of Social Sciences Research: Reviews Remote Sensing and GIS manuscripts, Jun., 2013 to date

4. Team member, Climatic Extremes, Mining, and Mycobacterium ulcerans: A Coupled Systems Perspective (Funded by the National Science Foundation, USA), 2012-2014

5. Team member, Artisanal Mining, Smallholder Farming and Economic Development: Developing a Strategy for Poverty Alleviation in Rural Ghana (Funded by Development Partnerships in Higher Education, UK), 2012- 2014

 

RESEARCH CONDUCTED

1. Spatial Dependency of Buruli Ulcer Disease on Geological Settings in Ghana, (2013-2014)

This research aimed at examining the effect of geological settings on the spread of BU disease caused by Mycobacterium Ulcerans (MU) in the Upper Denkyira West District (UDWD), Amansie West District (AWD) with Tarkwa Nsuaem Municipality (TNM) as a case control study area. Little research has, been conducted in geosciences in Ghana to investigate the link between geological settings and Buruli Ulcer (BU) disease. Geological maps of the study areas were extracted from the geological map of Ghana. Epidemiological data of BU disease collected from the National Buruli Ulcer Control Programme, district hospitals and from fieldwork were overlaid on geological maps of the study areas. Spatial analysis was then performed to identify the relationship between geological settings and BU disease spread in the study areas. Twenty-seven (27) communities were found to have cases of BU in the three study areas. Results also show that districts underlain by Birimian meta-sedimentary rock units which mainly contain minerals like of pyrites and arsenopyrites are more susceptible to BU disease than districts underlain by Tarkwaian siliciclastics and Birimian meta-volcanic rocks. This research thus offers an opportunity to link geological settings and BU disease as well as contributes to public health and environmental management in the study areas.

 

2. Spatial Dependency of Buruli Ulcer on Potential Surface Runoff and Potential Maximum Soil Water Retention, (2013-2014)

In this study, a landscape spatial hydrological modeling approach based on Potential Maximum Soil Water Retention (PMSWR), Soil Conservation Service Curve Number Grid (SCS CNGrid) and empirical evidence from field research were applied to understand their relationship with BU disease in two districts of Ghana.

Buruli Ulcer (BU) is an endemic prevalent disease in Ghana and other West African countries including; Cote d´Ivoire, Benin and Togo. Despite recent upsurge of research in Buruli Ulcer, the natural reservoir and mode of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU) have not yet been determined. However, all major foci are found in wetlands of tropical and subtropical countries. Landuse data, Hydrological Soil Groups (HSGs), Landsat images and Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) were used to generate the SCS CNGrid and the PMSWR of the study areas. The results of the SCS CNGrid and PMSWR maps linked BU endemic areas to low to moderate surface runoff potential and high to moderate PMSWR. BU endemic communities in the two districts were also mostly enclaved by galamsey (illegal) mining activities and farms. This study proved that the PMSWR and SCS CNGrid values are important hydrological parameters to determine surface runoff potential and thus delineate BU disease prone areas.

 

3. Spatio-temporal Land Cover Change Detection in the Lake Bosomtwe Catchment, (2012-2013)

This study investigated the spatio-temporal land cover changes within 6 km of Lake Bosomtwe catchment in Ghana. In this study, Landsat images acquired on February 1, 2008 and January 13, 2013 were used. Ground Control Points (GCPs) were taken with a handheld Juno SB GPS receiver at strategic locations to verify land cover types. Unsupervised and Supervised (hybridized) classifications were performed to generate land cover maps of the study area. Three land cover classes were distinguished. They were water, vegetated and non-vegetated areas. The vegetation cover map of 2008 and 2013 obtained from the hybridized classification were then analyzed to determine the change in land cover over the period. In addition, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was applied to identify areas of vegetation and non-vegetation cover. The study revealed decrease in vegetation cover of the study area. For example, between 2008 and 2013 vegetation cover decreased by 4.65 km2. The research therefore recommends that management intensifies the Lake Bosomtwe reforestation project.

 

4. Detecting Land Cover Changes in the Volta River Catchment using GIS and Remote Sensing Methods, (2012-2013)

The objective of this study was to monitor land cover change within 6 km buffer of the Volta Lake. Over the years, the Volta River Basin has undergone significant changes in diverse ways. Human activities such as farming and infrastructure development as well as afforestation projects have led to changes in the land cover. The shapefile of the study area was co-registered with the Land sat images. Hybridized classification of multi-temporal images was carried out based on unsupervised classification, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), visualization of true/false color composite as well as local knowledge from ground truthing. Readings were taken for 50 geographical positions and corresponding classes of vegetation for estimating classification accuracy. Overall accuracy for the classified 2013 ETM+ image was 88.42%. The results revealed a significant increase in the surface area of the Volta Lake from 4173.34 km2 in 1985 to 5052.99 km2 in 2013. An increase of dense vegetation from 367.06 km2 in 1985 to 1035.07 km2 in 2013 and a significant decrease is sparse vegetation from 3604.71 km2 in 1985 to 2784.01 km2 in 2013 were revealed. However, when sparse and dense vegetation was considered as one class, an overall decrease of 152.69 km2 was obtained. Areas with virtually no evidence of vegetation increased from 2029.93 km2 in 1985 to 1303.08 km2 in 2013.

 

5. Geo-Property Tax Information System – A Case Study, (2011-2012)

The objective of this research was to create an interactive and user-friendly Geo-Property Tax Information System (GPTIS) that enables spatial query, visualization, efficient updating and processing of Property Tax records. The Property Tax Information System incorporated all the spatial and non-spatial details regarding built-up structures for effective maintenance, collection and update of Property Tax information. The developed System keeps track of both defaulters and non-defaulters of property taxes. The procedure used in this research involved; the collection of spatial and non-spatial data of properties in the municipality, designing the database as well as scripting and debugging in a Visual Basic (VB) environment embedded with MapObject. The result was a user-friendly GPTIS capable of displaying both spatial and non-spatial tax information. The application allows tax officers to perform spatial queries, update newly added properties as well as update and process tax records.

 

6. Geo-Locating Motor Vehicle Owners – A Case Study, (2011-2012)

In this research, an application was developed to geo-locate motor vehicles and their owners using Vehicle Registration Numbers (VRN), Personal Identification (PID) or Chassis Number (CN). The procedures employed in this application include; the development of the application’s algorithm, geodata acquisition and editing, GPS field validation, digitizing, providing GIS data access through MapObjects and ODBC Driver as well as scripting and debugging in a Visual Basic (VB) environment embedded with MapObjects. The result was user-friendly stand-alone application capable of geo-locating vehicle owners using VRN, PID and CN. The application provided both spatial and non-spatial information of broken-down and abandoned vehicles on our roads, vehicles involved in traffic offences or accident with other road users who refuse to provide their details. The application will be used by the Police MTTU and DVLA to trace and geo-locate owners of vehicles involved in crime and traffic offences. To enable this application trace owners of  motor vehicles spatially and non-spatially, it is recommended that the VRN or the PID of owners or the CN of motor vehicles involved in a traffic offence, crime or accident is always noted and also the incident reported to the Police MTTU or DVLA. The Police MTTU and DVLA will be able to trace the owner of the vehicle, even if they aren't the ones involved in the crime, traffic offence or accident.

 

7. Web-based Land Records System - The case of Ghana, (2011-2012)

The objective of this research was to develop a web-based land records system to provide a quick, secure and transparent access to land records and land registration via the Internet and other communication devices. This became necessary since there was general indiscipline and lack of transparency in the land market. The System de-centralizes the land registration process and thus reduces the workload on the land registration offices.The System also encourages land registration or legal parcel documentation due to the flexibility and simplicity of the system. The methods employed involve (1) providing GIS data access through MapObject and ODBC Driver, (2) integrating Google Earth (GE) with GIS application using COM API: (3) importing GIS data into Google Earth: (4) linking GIS data with KML: (5) accessing external tabular data through ‘relate’ and (6) querying and visualizing land records online using Google Maps.The outcome of this study was a user-friendly web-based land records from which authorized users and subscribers can visualize and access a secured land records in the country. The new system brings transparency and improves the way land records are maintained and administered in the country. The system does not only simplify the process of land registration and land records keeping, butalso provides many collateral benefits.


8. Mapping land surface temperature and land cover to detect urban heat island effect: a case study of Tarkwa, South West Ghana, (2011)

The objective of this study was to detect UHI from Land Surface Temperature (LST) and to investigate whether land cover has any influence on UHI in Tarkwa, South West Ghana using satellite remote sensing techniques. A Landsat 7 ETM+ image, DEM and meteorological data were used to generate a land cover map with the maximum likelihood classification algorithm whiles LST was modeled with the Landsat Plank’s curve. Validation of the LST map was achieved by comparing it with air temperature measured at the UMaT meteorological station. The mean modeled LST of 298.60 Kelvin compared well with the mean observed air temperature of 298.30 Kelvin. Furthermore, LST ranged between 289 and 305 Kelvin while urban areas and bare soils had higher LSTs than vegetated areas implying that higher NDVI areas are associated with lower temperatures. Hence, LST maps produced indicated the existence of UHI effect in the Tarkwa area. From the study it is evident that impervious and non-evaporative surfaces have high LSTs due to absence of vegetation. Therefore, uncontrolled land cover changes may intensify the UHI effect. The study proved that remote sensing could be used in operational mapping of LST for climate studies, vegetation monitoring and detecting UHIs in the humid regions of Ghana. This confirms the important role Earth observation and geoinformation technology can play in environmental monitoring and management as global climate and land cover changes.

 

9. Remote Sensing and GIS in Modeling Actual Evapotranspiration: A Case Study Using the Triangle Method in Tarkwa, South West Ghana, (2011)

This research investigated how hydrological cycle is modified by changes in Daily Actual Evapotranspiration (DAET). To evaluating and determining DAET through time. This study employed Landsat 7 ETM+ images, DEM and climate data to model DAET in the Tarkwa area of Ghana using the triangle method. Validation was carried out by comparing modeled DAET with observed pan evaporation. An average value of 4.29 mm/day and 5.48 mm/day obtained on January 15 and May 7 DAET maps respectively compared well with the measured pan evaporation of 4.5 mm/day and 5.5 mm/day for January 15 and May 7 2002 respectively. The differences were within the FAO pan coefficient of 0.35 and 0.85. Results also indicate that the urban and bare soil areas had lower DAET values than open and dense forest areas which imply DAET increases with amount of plant available water. These confirm that run-off is the main cause of water losses in urban and bare soil areas. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that LST and net radiation were significantly related to DAET. The results demonstrate suitability of Landsat images in estimating DAET in Tarkwa

 

10. GIS in Water Supply Network Maintenance in Tarkwa, South Western Ghana, (2011)

In this study, GIS was used to investigate the water supply network of a section of Tarkwa Municipality in South Western Ghana. The objective was to create a geodatabase that supports improved operations and performance and to determine costs of asset replacement. Digital maps of the study area were re-projected to the WGS84 UTM Zone 30 North projection. Analogue maps of the mains and lateral pipelines were scanned and geo-referenced to this projection. The pipelines and valves were then manually digitized, their attribute tables created and a geodatabase model developed. The analysis indicates that more than half of the network is over-aged. Also of the 11 km of pipelines, more than 76% was laid in 1975 and 1978. AC and PVC pipes laid in 1975 and 1978 comprise 29 and 47% respectively while the rest of the study area is covered by AC and PVC pipes laid in 1987. This study also observed that the length of AC pipes have consistently reduced since 1975. The study further demonstrated the suitability of GIS techniques in studying water distribution networks. The system developed three scenarios that can support the design of long term expansion and replacement action plans. The study also provides detailed spatially referenced information on pipelines and the associated cost of replacement as they reach the designed lifespan

 

11. Developing an Online Map for the Accra Metropolis, (2011)

This study presented the development of an online mapping application for the Accra Metropolitan Assembly (A.M.A.) using MapServer, an Internet GIS technology.MapServer is an open source development environment used for creating mapping applications to display dynamic spatial maps over the Internet as well as generating geographic image maps. MapServer is fast, flexible and runs on all major operating systems.  The process of developing the Accra online map, its advantages and drawbacks of the MapServer application were discussed. The application displayed interactive online map for the A.M.A. area drawn from shapefiles. GIS functions such as measure, query and navigation tools including pan, zoom etc, were programmed. The application served as an online resource for disseminating public information for the Accra Metropolitan Assembly. Furthermore, as more digital spatial data on mining concessions, geology, water resources, protected areas etc., becomes available, the online GIS could be re-structured and used by the relevant Government Agencies to disseminate information on the web so as to attract more foreign investment in the area of mining and related industries.

 

12. Detecting areas of vegetation change in the Densu River Basin, Ghana, (2004-2005)

The objectives of this study were to monitor vegetation change patterns and to determine how land management practices have contributed to vegetation change in the Densu Basin. The procedures employed involved independently classifying multi-temporal images using a hybridized classification method after geo-referencing and coregistering images. A land cover map of the basin was pre-loaded onto a Juno SB hand-held GPS receiver and geo-referenced for ground-truth delineation of vegetation classes. Readings were taken for thirty-three (33) geographical positions and corresponding classes of vegetation to enhance classification accuracy.The Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVI) of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) images were monitored for variations in the NDVI values due to seasonal changes. The effects due to phenology were then minimized using the Normalized Difference Senescence Vegetation Index (NDSVI) method. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique was used to identify possible areas of vegetation depletion in the basin. The trend of change was further determined by a NDVI image differencing method by setting threshold values that best discriminate per pixel change. The result of this study revealed significant loss of vegetation cover in the basin. For example whereas open forest was dominant in the northern sector with a total coverage area of 490 km2 in the 1985 classification, the same vegetation type disappeared by 1991 and was replaced by scattered trees with dense herbs. There was a further decrease of forest cover between 1991 and 2000 from 332 km2 in 1991 to 273 km2 in 2000 representing a loss of 59 km2. Also, between 2000 and 2002, there was a decrease of 41 km2 in vegetation cover. This study provided information to assist land managers to gather ecological information about the basin to help in planning and managing the basin’s resources.

 

JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS

1. Alfred A. Duker, Saviour Mantey. (2017) “Environmental Hypothesis: Arsenic can be a Contributory Factor in Mycobacterium Ulcerans InfectionInternational Journal of Environmental Science, 2, 149-165.

2. Mantey, S., Gawu, S. K. Y., Amankwah, R. K.  and Duker A. A. (2014), “Spatial Dependency of Buruli Ulcer Disease on Geological Settings in Ghana”, International Journal of Science and Research,Vol. 3 Issue 9, pp. 1714-1725.

3. Mantey, S. Amankwah, R. K. and Duker, A. A. (2014), “Spatial Dependency of Buruli Ulcer on Potential Surface Runoff and Potential Maximum Soil Water Retention”, International Journal of Research in Medical and Health Sciences, Vol. 03, No. 5, pp. 01-15.

4. Mantey, S. and Baffoe, P.E. (2013), “Spatio-temporal Land Cover Change Detection in the Lake Bosomtwe Catchment” The International Journal of Engineering and Science, Vol. 2, Issue 10, pp. 60-65.

5. Mantey, S. and Tagoe, N.D. (2013), “Spatial Modelling of Soil Conservation Service Curve Number Grid and Potential Maximum Soil Water Retention to Delineate Flood Prone Areas: A Case Study”, Research Journal of Environmental and Earth Sciences, 5(08): pp.449-456.

6. Mantey, S. and Tagoe, N.D. (2013), “Detecting Land Cover Changes in the Volta River Catchment using GIS and Remote Sensing Methods”, Research Journal of Environmental and Earth Sciences, 5(07): 418-424.

7. Aduah, M. S. and Mantey, S. (2012), “Remote Sensing for Mapping wetland floods in Kafue Flats, Zambia”, Ghana Mining Journal, pp. 33-40.

8. Tagoe, N. D. and Mantey, S. (2011), “Web-based Land Records System - The case of Ghana”, International Journal of Scientific & Engineering Research Volume 2, Issue 11, November-2011, ISSN 2229-5518, pp.1-9.

9. Tagoe, N. D. and Mantey, S. (2011), “Developing Geo-web portals with Google Map API - A Case study of the Fichtner Group”, International Journal of Scientific & Engineering Research Volume 2, Issue 12, December-2011, ISSN 2229-5518, pp. 1-7.

10. Aduah, M. S., Mantey, S. and Tagoe, N. D. (2012) “Mapping land surface temperature and land cover to detect urban heat island effect: a case study of Tarkwa, South West Ghana”, Research Journal of Environmental and Earth Sciences, 4(1): 68-75, 2012, ISSN: 2041-0492.

11. Aduah, M. S., Mantey, S. and Kwesi, E. A. A. (2011), “Remote Sensing and GIS in Modeling Actual Evapotranspiration: A Case Study Using the Triangle Method in Tarkwa, South West Ghana”, European Journal of Scientific Research ISSN 1450-216X Vol.62, No.2, pp. 257-266.

12. Aduah, M. S., Mantey, S. and Tagoe, N. D. (2011), “GIS in Water Supply Network Maintenance in Tarkwa, South Western Ghana”, Research Journal of Environmental and Earth Sciences, 3(6): 737-744.

 

CONFERENCE PUBLICATIONS

1. Mantey, S. and Tagoe, N. D. (2016), “DTM Generation from Airborne Lidar Point Clouds”, 4th UMaT Biennial International Mining & Mineral Conference, 3rd – 6th August, 2016.

2. Mantey, S., Tagoe, N. D. and Abaidoo, C. (2014), “Estimation of Land Surface Temperature and Vegetation Abundance Relationship – A Case Study”, (Proceedings of 3rd UMaT Biennial International Mining & Mineral Conference on Innovations in Mining and Mineral Processing; Expanding the Frontiers of Mining Technology, Tarkwa,  30  July to 02 August, 2014.

3. Mantey, S., Tagoe, N. D. and Aduah, M. S. (2012), “Geo-locating Motor Vehicle Owners – A Case Study”, 2nd UMaT Biennial International Mining & Mineral Conference – 1st to 4th August, 2012.

4. Mantey, S., and Tagoe, N. D. (2012) “Geo-Property Tax Information System - A Case Study of the Tarkwa Nsuaem Municipality, Ghana”, FIG Working Week 2012: Knowing to manage the territory, protect the environment, evaluate the cultural heritage”, Rome Italy, from 6th to 10th, May 2012.

5. Tagoe, N. D., Mantey, S., Adjei, S., Aduah, M. S. and Kwesi, E. A. A (2012) “The Role of the Land Surveyor in Land Acquisition and Compensation – A Case Study of the Tarkwa Mining Communities, Ghana”, FIG Working Week 2012: Knowing to manage the territory, protect the environment, evaluate the cultural heritage”, Rome Italy, from 6th to 10th, May 2012.

6. Mantey, S., Tagoe, N. D. and Aduah, M. S. (2011), “Detecting areas of vegetation change in the Densu River Basin, Ghana”, River Basin Management VI, WIT Transactions on Ecology and the Environment, vol. 146, pp. 37-48.

7. Kwesi, E. A. A., Mantey, S. and Aduah, M. S., (2011) “Land Compensation in the Oil and Gas Regions of Ghana-Challenges involved and the role of the Surveyor”, The Ghana Surveyor, Special LS Division Seminar 2011 Edition, pp. 9-16.

8. Mantey, S. and Aduah, M. S (2010), “Developing an Online Map for the Accra Metropolis Using MapServer”, 1st UMaT International Mining & Mineral Conference, 4th to 7th August, 2010.

 

RECORD OF SERVICE

1. University Training Coordinator, University of Mines and Technology (UMaT), Tarkwa, Aug. 2016 to date

2. Faculty Training Officer, University of Mines and Technology (UMaT), Tarkwa, Aug., 2016 to date

3. Senior Hall Tutor, Dr Michael Tetteh Kofi Hall (K. T. Hall), University of Mines and Technology (UMaT), Tarkwa, Feb. 2015 to Jul. 2016

4. Department Examinations Officer, University of Mines and Technology (UMaT), Tarkwa, Aug., 2014 to Aug., 2015

5. University Training Coordinator, University of Mines and Technology (UMaT), Tarkwa, 2012 to Aug., 2014

6. Faculty Training Officer, University of Mines and Technology (UMaT), Tarkwa, Aug., 2012 to Aug., 2014

7. Resource Person– Career Guidance Programme organised  by the Ghana Education Service, Tarkwa Nsuaem Municipal Education Directorate, Tarkwa, 2012 -2013

8. Department Training Officer, Geomatic Engineering Department, University of Mines and Technology (UMaT), Tarkwa, Aug., 2010 to Aug., 2012

9. Academic Tutor, Geomatic Engineering Department, University of Mines and Technology (UMaT), Tarkwa, Aug., 2008 to date

10. Hall Fellow, Gold Hall, University of Mines and Technology (UMaT), Tarkwa, Aug., 2008 to date

11. Member – Geomatic Engineering, Undergraduate level Detailed Course Syllabuses Committee, Nov., 2008